A student from China has been rescued by police in Thailand after a kidnap gang lured her to the country, demanded an eight-million-yuan (US$1.1 million) ransom and threatened to expose pornographic photos of her and even sell her organs if the money was not paid.

The woman, who is studying in Australia, had been missing for about a week before she was found by Thai police, the Southern Metropolis News reported.

Only identified as Amber, the woman began her studies at the Australian National University in February.

Her case came under the spotlight in China at the end of April when her friend wrote a post on Weibo, looking for information on her whereabouts.

The friend said Amber had not contacted her parents or friends since April 15 and had failed to attend mid-term tests. She was also not in her dormitory, the post said.

The young student is now back with her family in China after Thai police found her in a Bangkok hotel. Photo: Baidu

Amber’s parents made a report to the police in China.

The missing woman’s mother said she received a call from her daughter’s mobile on April 17 from a man asking her to remit eight million yuan as “compensation”.

If his request was not met, he would force Amber to perform in pornographic videos and threatened to send her to Cambodia to have her organs harvested for cash.

Noticing that transfers totalling 7.5 million Thai baht (US$204,000) had been made from Amber’s bank account to that of strangers in recent weeks, her parents contacted a crime victim aid group in Thailand for help.

According to Thai police, Amber entered the country on April 13. She stayed for one night at a hotel near a Bangkok airport before going missing for a couple of days.

On April 20, she was found, unscathed, in another hotel by police.

The student told officers that in February, three men, posing as a telecoms company employee, a government official and a police officer, called her, telling her that messages sent from her mobile phone had led to someone’s suicide.

They told her that if she did not pay eight million yuan in compensation, she would face “horrible results”.

Amber was forced to sign an eight-million-yuan debt confirmation letter. The racketeers told her not to reveal any of their conversation to others or she would end up in court.

Amber sent money to their designated bank accounts. Her last transfer of 500,000 yuan (US$69,000) was blocked because of the large amount involved.

The three men instructed her to fly to Thailand as they said they had contacts in the kingdom who would be able to clear Amber’s “criminal record”.

It is unclear if the racketeers have been caught.

It is unclear if the gang members, who posed as officials and police, are in custody. Photo: Baidu

Amber’s friend told the media that she returned to China on April 21.

“It’s lucky that she was saved in time. She has not been hurt, but she still remains frightened,” the friend was quoted as saying, adding: “She will go back to Australia when her emotions are stable.”

Chinese students studying abroad often fall victim to such fraudsters.

Last year, police from China rescued a young man studying in a European country from a crime group.

The student said he was duped while making investments online and ended up being trafficked across Southeast Asia as criminals demanded a two-million-yuan (US$280,000) ransom from his parents.

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